Welcome to the Transit in the Tetons Information Page

 

This page has been created to provide you with easily accessible background information before the Workshop on December 16th.  Please refer to your registration confirmation email for lodging and other information.

 

Use the table of contents links below to quickly go to a topic.

 

If you have questions please contact  support@wildernesstechnologies.com or call 208-520-9192

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Table of Contents

 

Agenda:

Transit in the Tetons – Summary Agenda    27

Transit in the Tetons – Working Agenda  27

10:30 AM  Structure, Issues, and Opportunities    27

11:00 AM  Proposed Problem Statements    27

11:30 AM  Proposed Yellowstone-Teton Vision for Regional Mobility    27

1:00 PM   Change Analysis I - Forces      27

2:15 PM   Change Analysis II - Critical Success Factors    27

4:00 PM   Action Planning - Identifying what’s next    27

analysis worksheet    27

 

Background:

Targhee Regional Transportation Authority (TRPTA)    27

Community and Rural Transportation (CART)    27

Southern Teton Area Rapid Transit (START)    27

Idaho  SAFETEA Funding Estimates 2004-2009   27

Wyoming SAFETEA Funding Estimates 2004-2009   27

Weekday Commuter Traffic Peaks Teton Pass, July 2005    27

Downtown Driggs Design Charrett Draft Report- December 2005   27

Grand Teton National Park Transportation Plan    27

SAFETEA-LU – Alternative Transportation in Parks and Public Lands    27

Energy Policy Act of 2005 – Section 721   27

A Yellow Bus for the Greater Yellowstone       27

Greater Yellowstone-Teton Clean Cities Coalition     28


Transit in the Tetons – Summary Agenda    Top of the Document

 

Purpose:         Determine how transportation systems contribute to a sustainable socioeconomic future in the Yellowstone-Teton Region

 

Goal:               By the end of the workshop participants will define a level of effort appropriate for development of a regional transportation system

 

 

10:00 AM        Welcome and Introductions  

10:30 AM        Structure, Issues, and Opportunities

11:00 AM        Problem Statements – Why We’re Here

11:30 AM        A Vision for Regional Mobility

12:00 PM        Working Lunch Served

  1:00 PM        Change Analysis I - Forces

·         forces that restrain change

·         forces that drive change

·         which ones can be affected / harnessed ?

  2:00 PM        Break

  2:15 PM        Change Analysis II - Critical Success Factors

·         characteristics of a sustainable, regional, multimodal system?

·         staging strategy

·         how much integration of social, tourism, and commuting needs?

·         achieving solvency

  3:45 PM        Break

  4:00 PM        Action Planning

·         what path forward best fits the critical success factors and force analysis?

·         who will do what when

·         Wrap up

  5:00 PM        Adjourn

 

 

 

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Transit in the Tetons – Working Agenda  Top of the Document

 

Purpose:         Determine how transportation systems contribute to a sustainable socioeconomic future in the Yellowstone-Teton Region

 

Goal:               By the end of the workshop participants will define a level of effort appropriate for development of a regional transportation system

 

10:00 AM        Welcome and Introductions - all

 

10:30 AM  Structure, Issues, and Opportunities for this Workshop    Top of the Document

 

 

For the next six hours you are being asked to suspend some fundamental beliefs about how things work.  We will explore how our transportation system evolved into what it is today and where it may go tomorrow.  Perhaps most importantly we will seek an understanding of how we might be able to make things better.

 

Make no mistake.  This is an extremely complex and difficult task. No matter how smart we may be nor how hard we work today we will only taking one of the steps necessary, but each of us represents a piece of the solution and that is why you have been asked to contribute to this dialog. 

 

We do have an advantage though and that is the unique part of the world we call the Greater Yellowstone-Teton region.  This special place is where the beauty of our natural world and the engine of human commerce are irrevocably marching towards a future that will test our judgment and will.  Our work today will focus on one major aspect of that nexus: transportation and the role of transit.

 

              As we discuss the various aspects of this situation the following definitions will be useful for understanding what makes up a transportation system.

 

Definition: A transportation node is location where people reside, work, recreate, shop, obtain services, or transfer from one type of conveyance to another.

 

Definition: A transportation link is a connection between two nodes and can be a private vehicle, bus, rail line, pathway, or combination thereof.

 

Definition: A transportation system is a set of links and nodes that may or may not be continuous and coordinated.


 

The workshop is structured to answer four questions:

 

1.      What problems are we addressing?

2.      What are the opportunities and vision?

3.      What changes are needed and how might they work?

4.      Based on today’s discussions how do we proceed?

 

These questions will be addressed by the participants sequentially as each question is designed to provide a basis for the next.  For example, the discussion of the problem statements will suggest opportunities and a vision → a vision suggests where change may be required → change analysis can be used to identify opposing and supporting forces as well as those features required to be successful → and finally, the information from the change analysis can be used to determine if and how to proceed to action. 

 

We begin the process by putting forth for discussion five basic problem statements that are the driving force for this discussion on transportation. 

 

 

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11:00 AM  Proposed Problem Statements    Top of the Document

 

A.    Disconnected Links – Economic development and the regional quality of life is diminished by a disconnected system of transportation investments and potential development opportunities. 

B.     Displacement Commutes – workers unable to live near where they work must commute longer distances increasing expense, risk, and congestion.

C.     Workforce Instability – Attraction and retention of qualified employees is made more difficult due to transportation stress and expense.

D.    Access and Mobility Inequities – A healthy community and economic structure requires a basic level of social diversity and access.  If the only ones who are able to work and play in a Park, a community, or a region are those who can afford it, the larger community will not be sustainable except as an anomaly.

E.     Rapid growth causing stress on physical infrastructures and planning systems.  This problem is exacerbated by the fact that the impacts and solutions are frequently regional while the political structures responsible for managing the growth are generally local.

 

Are these accurate descriptions of the problems that need to be addressed?

 

Are these root causes or are there other underlying problems?

 

If there are underlying causes to what extent should they be addressed in this workshop?

 

 

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11:30 AM  Proposed Yellowstone-Teton Vision for Regional Mobility    Top of the Document

 

A.    The region is internationally recognized as the place where the natural beauty, recreation, quality of life, and transportation are all part of one integrated experience.

B.     With one travel reservation a visitor (or resident) would obtain the ability to move throughout the entire GYTA using a mixture of transit, bike, hike, or boat, without having to utilize a private or rental vehicle.

C.     All people in the region have equitable access to transportation for jobs, social services, and recreation.

D.    The design of the transportation system minimizes energy use and impact on the environment.

E.     The design of the transportation system creates the ability for each community to have one or more neighborhoods where people can live without having to own a private vehicle.

F.      To a user the transportation system functions seamlessly across political boundaries

 

12:00 PM        Working Lunch Served

 

 

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1:00 PM   Change Analysis I - Forces      Top of the Document

 

To analyze change, participants will develop and evaluate one or more changes that address the previously identified problem statements and Vision. Use the worksheet to state:

 

·         What facts are known?

·         What are the driving forces?

·         What are the restraining forces?

·         What is unknown?

 

The list below suggests “placeholder” changes to start the discussion.  You are encouraged to revise or replace these placeholders with better ideas that arise during the workshop discussions.  The bullets listed after the changes suggest some points that may be included in the analysis.

 

·         Teton Valley Hospital, St. John’s Hospital, School Districts

 

These large employers form key elements of the core community infrastructure.  Attraction and retention of employees is affected by housing availability and ease of commute. 

 

Change:  Public transportation available to employees and patients.

o       Number of employees and where they reside

o       Is employee transportation an issue?

o       Ideal situation would be …

 

·         Grand Targhee and Jackson Hole Ski Corporation

 

Tourist based industries have the dual challenges of moving guests and employees in separate but equally important channels.  Current transportation systems are generally ad hoc and based on traditional models of employee bussing and hotel/resort shuttles.

 

Change:  Guests and workers are able to access an integrated public transit capability that replaces current ad hoc services.

o       Number of visitors by transportation mode

o       Who are the transportation providers

o       Describe the infrastructure (vehicles, routes, frequency)

o       Impact of employee trips

o       Ideal situation would be …

 

·         Idaho and Wyoming Transportation Departments

 

The state DOTs have an important role in developing both transit and highway infrastructure, but usually their responsibilities are exercised within their state boundaries.  When the transportation system needs become regional, solutions can require coordination of multiple political jurisdictions and economic interests.  This is especially true in the Greater Yellowstone where three states, the federal Departments of the Interior, Agriculture, Energy, and Transportation, and many diverse private interests all have a role in determining the future of the resource.

 

To effectively address these issues the federal agencies and state DOTs  could forge a new type of cooperative effort to coordinate their resources and address the problem as an integrated management team.

 

Change: Implement a multi-jurisdictional (DOT, DOI, USDA, local) approach to developing a regional transportation system.

o       Integrating social services, tourism, and public transportation

o       Identifying common ground in roles and responsibilities

o       Coordination of state, federal, and local planning

o       How to coordinate while preserving essential roles & responsibilities

o       Realistic assessment of transit vs highway priorities

o        Ideal situation would be …

 


·         Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks

 

Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks serve the dual purposes of providing for the enjoyment of park visitors today while preserving their resources unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations. Park managers are faced with many difficult challenges and choices as they attempt to balance these two purposes. Transportation system improvements are something that are recognized as having the potential to reduce impacts while providing additional options for people to enjoy the parks. But the choices are not clear cut, the needs not well demonstrated, and transportation planning and development must be viewed in the context of many other high priority issues for the parks, as well as the realities of funding. The transportation needs and desires of park visitors who are recreating and touring the parks are very different from the transportation needs of people living in communities outside the parks who are going about their daily lives. Improved transportation systems that can improve opportunities for visitors to enjoy the parks are desirable, but must be undertaken with clear goals in mind and within the context of competing priorities and funding realities.

 

Change:  An initial transit capability for park visitors that is focused on a viable market segment and that will provide valuable information and experience for future system development.

 

o       The National Park visitor has unique needs and expectations

o       Who pays for the cost shift from private vehicles to transit?

o       Must be able to attract voluntary shifts from private vehicle

o       Who are the transportation providers?

o       Described the infrastructure (vehicles, routes, maintenance)

o       Ideal situation would be …

 

·         National Forests

 

As a branch of the Department of Agriculture, national forests are managers of vast tracts of public land that provide recreation, forest products, grazing, mining, and ecological preserves.  As such they are frequent arbiters of conflicting interests and determinations of carrying capacity.

 

The public lands of the National Forests contain large and diverse transportation networks that consist of roads, pathways, trails, airstrip, and river corridors.  Any comprehensive regional transportation system will eventually interface with the forests.  Whether it is parking on Teton Pass or extending a pathway along historic rail lines the forest will determine how numerous critical links in the system can be connected.

 

Change:  Identify ways to reduce parking pressure at trailheads.

o       Where are the most critical impact areas

o       Where are high value potential pathway/corridors

o       Ideal situation would be …

 

·         START, CART, TRPTA, PRT -  AllTrans and other private carriers

 

Regional public transportation has evolved along two general themes.  Where there are enough tourists to support it, both public and private systems have carved out niches primarily based on moving employees and guests.  In other gateway communities where tourism traffic has generally been abandoned to rental cars and private vehicles, transportation capabilities have focused on social services.  Again both private and public systems are supported although not necessarily in a coordinated system.

 

Change:  Coordinated schedules and shared infrastructure leverage each organization’s ability to provide service and reduce costs.

o       Describe the mission of the current organization

o       Number of customers

o       Who are the users - demographics

o       Describe the infrastructure (vehicles, routes, frequency)

o       Changes in progress or under discussion

o       Ideal situation would be …

 

2:00 PM          Break

 

 

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2:15 PM          Change Analysis II - Critical Success Factors    Top of the Document

 

Critical success factors are defined as those things that must be in place if the vision is to be achieved.  During the brainstorming and discussion to identify these factors there will be factors identified that may contribute to success, but may not be critical.  While these should be noted for the record of the workshop, the key question to ask is this factor absolutely necessary to achieve the vision?

 

Here are some things to think about:

 

·         2005 Energy and SAFTEA-LU Legislation

·         What is a “critical mass” for a regional partnership?

·         People must be willing to shift from private vehicles

·         Characteristics of a sustainable, regional, multimodal system

·         Staging strategy

·         Gas tax revenue reductions

·         How much integration of social, tourism, and commuting needs?

·         Achieving solvency

·         What are realistic expectations for new programs?

·         Similar programs and activities in other regions

·         Creating a market for Regional Transit

o       Social services

o       A Europass for the Greater Yellowstone-Teton

o       Employees getting to work

o       Periodic Specialty Buses (medical, ski, shopping)

o       Multi-modal Eco tours? (fly/bus/bike/hike/drive)

o       Can separate services function like a single system?

 

3:45 PM          Break

 

 

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4:00 PM          Action Planning - Identifying what’s next    Top of the Document

 

This final phase of the workshop is to bring closure by establishing consensus on a set of actions supported by the change analysis and critical success factors.  Predicting the nature of these actions is not possible without going through the process, but we can describe some characteristics of what “actionable” consensus might look like. 

 

1.      Any actions identified will have clear ties to the problem statements, Vision, and change analysis.

 

2.      Where possible actions identified will consist of concrete, measurable tasks that are scaleable (i.e. products can scale up or down with funding)

 

3.      There would be a group of organizations willing to commit resources to partner to refine and translate the products of this workshop into a set of proposals.

 

4.      Plausible funding streams are identified for supporting subsequent work.

 

5.      There is a commitment from key players to seek incorporation of the workshop products into their organization’s objectives.

 

6.      There is a structure set in place to continue this communication and development process.

 

Keep in mind that the consensus can range from broad new initiatives to much more conservative status quo or minor change scenarios.  No matter what the scale of actions the group identifies, the characteristics described above should still apply.  Even status quo could benefit from documentation of the analysis for future reference.

 

5:00 PM          Adjourn

 

 

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analysis worksheet   Top of the Document

 

TOPIC:

 

1.  What is Known

2.  Driving Forces

 

 

3.  Restraining Forces

4.  What Don’t We Know

 

 

 

 

 

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Targhee Regional Transportation Authority (TRPTA)    Top of the Document

 

 

Targhee Regional Public Transportation Authority (T.R.P.T.A.) is a government entity established by Bonneville County, Idaho voters in 1994 pursuant to Idaho Code Title 40, Chapter 21.  As a transportation authority it is similar to a cemetery district without a cemetery district’s taxing authority. 

 

In Idaho, transportation authorities receive funding from a city and/or county’s general fund.  T.R.P.T.A. will receive approximately $150,000 total local funding from Idaho Falls, Ammon, Ucon, and Bonneville County for FY 2006.  This funding is used to meet the local match requirements for the Federal Transit Administration’s (FTA) §5307 urban grant program. Calculated on a population base formula, Congress allocated $740,000 to T.R.P.T.A. for FY 2006.  T.R.P.T.A. receives an annual allocation and has the year of allocation plus 3 years to spend the grant funds or return the unspent balance to the U. S. Treasury.

 

From 1994 through June 2002, T.R.P.T.A. contracted with CART, Inc., Idaho Falls, Idaho, to provide urban transportation services.  In July 2002, T.R.P.T.A. ceased contracting for services and started operating its own bus system within the Idaho Falls Urbanized Area.  In 2005 TRPTA and CART entered into discussions to combine their services and the discussions are nearing conclusion.

 

T.R.P.T.A has 4 buses serving the older residential sections of Idaho Falls and the commercial/medical facilities located between 17th Street and Sunnyside Road.  Limited service is provided to Ammon, Idaho.  The service model is similar to a deviated, fixed route system.   There are published scheduled stops along a route with two transfer points.  People may schedule special pick-ups between the scheduled stops. 

 

A boarding is every time a person “boards” a bus.  If a person transfers to another bus en route to his destination, the transfer would count as a separate boarding for a total of 2 boardings for that individual.   Although T.R.P.T.A. only operates from 7:00 a.m., through 6:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, it has experienced a slow but steady growth.  TRPTA recorded a 16% increase in boardings between FY 2004 (37,915) and FY 2005 (43,816).  In FY 2005, the boarding demographics were as follows:  23% of the boardings were general public,  25% were seniors (60+), 13% were students, and 39% experienced some degree of  physical or cognitive limitations.  

 

VISION FOR THE FUTURE

 

Locally, T.R.P.T.A. has the architectural firm of Alderson, Karst, and Mitro developing the design for a new bus terminal in Idaho Falls.  The facility will be available to all local and intercity public carriers.  The plan includes developing a shuttle service between the terminal and the Idaho Falls Airport.  The goal is to develop a system allowing a person to make one telephone call and arrange transportation services anywhere in Southeast Idaho and points beyond.

On a regional basis, T.R.P.T.A. will be working with Teton, Fremont, Madison, and Jefferson Counties in developing a multi-county integrated transportation system including coordination with the START bus system from Jackson, Wyoming.   The first steps are being taken as T.R.P.T.A. and the city and county officials negotiate Intergovernmental Agreements for the balance of FY 2006 and the coming years.

 

CONTACT INFORMATION

 

Addition information may be obtained by contacting T.R.P.T.A.’s executive director, Lynn S. Seymour, 1810 W. Broadway, Idaho Falls, ID  83402.  The office phone number is (208) 529-1489, and the fax number is (208) 529-1338.  Office hours are 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.  T.R.P.T.A. does not have an official web site and is in the process of changing the business e-mail address.

 

 

 

 

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Community and Rural Transportation (CART)    Top of the Document

 

 

BACKGROUND

 

C.A.R.T., Inc., also known as CART Transportation or CART, is a non-profit organization (501c3) that provides public transportation services to eastern Idaho.  The headquarters of CART is located at 850 Denver St., Idaho Falls, ID 83402 with satellite offices in Driggs, Rexburg and Salmon, Idaho. 

 

CART has been providing public transportation since 1978, beginning with five vehicles and seven employees.  Currently, CART has thirty nine employees, 30 vehicles, and provides over 85,000 rides annually.  CART has the largest public transportation service area in the state of Idaho and is the only public transportation system in Idaho with four offices to serve the public.  CART travels over 149,000 miles each year.

 

CART provides diversified transportation including demand response (door-to-door) transportation, fixed route services, intercity services and special transportation to elderly and disabled citizens.  In addition, CART is the ticket agent in Idaho Falls for Rimrock Trailways, who took over the Greyhound services in Montana, eastern Idaho and parts of Utah in the summer of 2004.  CART also sells tickets to Alltrans (Jackson Hole Express)    which provides service daily to Jackson, Wyoming.

 

A Board of twelve members provides oversight of the company and meets monthly on the third Monday of each month.  The company is managed by Linda Graham, Executive Director, and can be reached at (208) 522-2278.  CART Inc. also has a website where interest parties can find information about our services (www.cart-idaho.com).

 

IDAHO FALLS SERVICES

 

In addition to the administrative offices and the vehicles maintenance, the Idaho Falls Public Transportation Services are operated out of the Idaho Falls office, which is located at 850 Denver St., in Idaho Falls, Idaho.  The Operations Manager is Myrna Price and can be reached at (208) 522-2278.

 

CART Inc. provides an average of 4,300 rides each month in Bonneville County.  Approximately 48 % are seniors and/or disabled, 46% are students and 6% are general public.

           

Demand Response (Door-to-Door) Services

 

CART Inc. has six buses that are used to provide demand response services in Idaho Falls, Ammon, Iona, Ucon, Shelley and surrounding communities.  Operating hours are Monday – Friday, from 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.  Cost for this service is $3.00 one way for the general public in Idaho Falls.  If the service extends outside the city limits, the cost may increase, depending on the number of miles.  Contact the CART Inc. office for additional fare prices.

           

Intercity Public Transportation Services

 

Intercity Public Transportation services are provided daily between Idaho Falls and Rexburg, with stops at the Idaho Falls Airport and Rigby. The service begins in Idaho Falls and runs four times daily (8:00 a.m.., 11:30 a.m., 3:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m.).  The service returns to Idaho Falls one hour later (9:00 a.m., 12:30 p.m., 4:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m.).  The cost from Idaho Falls to Rigby is $4.00 and to Rexburg is $5.00.

 

A weekly Intercity Transportation Service is provided every Tuesday to Salmon from Idaho Falls.  The service begins in Idaho Falls at 7:00 a.m. with stops in Arco, Mackay and Challis.  The riders transfer to the Salmon Intercity Service in Challis.  The vehicle returns to Idaho Falls and arrives at 11:00 a.m.  The afternoon service leaves Idaho Falls at 4:00 p.m. and connects with the Salmon service at Challis for the return trip.  This service ends in Idaho Falls at 8:00 p.m.  The cost for this service (one-way) is $9.00 to Arco, $15.00 to Mackay, $18.00 to Challis and $25.00 to Salmon.

 

Specialized Transportation Services

 

CART Inc. provides specialized transportation services for groups, as needed.  Foster Grandparents, Disability Workshops, Senior Centers, Day Care Facilities have used CART Inc. services extensively.  The cost for the service is $50.00 per hour per bus.  Generally, we do not provide this service for the general public, but refer them to the available for-profit transportation companies in the area.

 

TICKET AGENT SERVICES

 

CART Inc. sells tickets for Rimrock Trailways, which is the bus company that replaced the Greyhound Transportation service from Montana to Salt Lake through Idaho Falls in 2004. The Idaho Falls Ticket Office is open from 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. – 12:30 a.m. seven days per week, including holidays.

 

 The Rimrock Trailways buses stop in Idaho Falls twice daily from Butte, Montana to Salt Lake City, Utah at 10:45 a.m. and 11:45 a.m.  Two buses from Salt Lake City, Utah stop in Idaho Falls on their way to Butte, Montana at 2:00 p.m. and 11:50 p.m.

 

In addition CART Inc. sells tickets for Alltrans Transportation (Jackson Hole Express).  Daily service is provided from Salt Lake City to Jackson, Wyoming, at 8:30 a.m. and returns at 4:15 p.m. on its way back to Salt Lake City, Utah. 

 

For information on Rimrock Trailways Services, contact the CART Inc. office at 1 (208) 522-0912 or Rimrock Trailways direct at 1 (800) 231-2222.  For information on Alltrans Transportation, call the CART Inc. ticket office at 1 (208) 522-0912 or 1 (800) 443-6133, to reach Alltrans Transportation directly.

 

REXBURG SERVICES

 

The Rexburg Public Transportation Services are operated out of the Rexburg Site office, located at 72B W. Main St, in Rexburg, Idaho.  The site manager, Terri Romriell, can be reached at (208) 356-9033.  The Rexburg service is unique in several ways.  It has the only CART Inc. fixed route service.  In addition, BYU-Idaho is located in Rexburg so an increasing number of students are utilizing the services offered in the area.

 

CART Inc. provides over 1900 rides each month in the Rexburg area, including St. Anthony, Archer and Rigby.  Approximately 69 % are senior citizens and/or disabled, 16% are students and 15% are general public.

 

Demand Response (Door-to-Door) Services

 

CART Inc. has two buses and one van located in Rexburg, designated for demand response services in Madison, Jefferson, and Fremont Counties.  Operating hours are Monday – Friday, from 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.  Cost for this service is $1.50 one way for the general public in Idaho Falls.  If the service extends outside the city limits, the cost may increase, depending on the number of miles.  Contact the CART Inc. office for additional fare prices.

           

Intercity Services

 

The Rexburg office is the connection location for the Intercity Service between Idaho Falls and Rexburg and Rexburg and Driggs and coordinates services between the two services.

 

            Fixed Route Services

 

The Rexburg fixed-route service is a fixed-route deviation service.  This service will deviate from the fixed route if the pick-up is within one/half mile of the scheduled route.  There are two buses and two routes, each with one/half hour intervals.  The first route begins at 7:00 a.m. and ends at 5:00 p.m.  The second route begins at 9:00 a.m. and ends at 6:30 p.m.  The fare for the fixed route is $.75 one way.  Passes are available from the Rexburg office.

 

            Specialized Transportation Services

 

CART Inc. provides specialized transportation services for groups, as needed.  Disability Workshops, Senior Centers, Day Care Facilities have used CART Inc. services in the Rexburg area.  Several times per year, senior citizens and disabled groups have requested transportation to Idaho Falls to attend special events, such as Independence Day fireworks or Christmas events.   The cost for the service is $50.00 per hour per bus. 

 

Generally, we do not provide this service for the general public, but refer them to the available for-profit transportation companies in the area.

 

DRIGGS SERVICES

 

The Driggs office is located at 47 S. Main St. in Driggs, Idaho.  The site manager, Randy Murdock, is in charge of operations in the Driggs/Teton County service area.  Services are provided in the Driggs, Victor area and surrounding area.

 

 CART Inc. provides over 11,200 rides each month in Teton County.  Approximately 63$ are disabled person and 13% are senior citizens.

 

Demand Response (Door-to-Door) Services

 

CART Inc. has two vehicles to provide demand response services in the Driggs/Teton County Area.  Operating hours are Monday – Friday, from 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.  Cost for this service is $1.50 in town and $3.00 out of town one way for the general public

 

            Intercity Services

 

Intercity Public Transportation services are provided daily (Monday-Friday) between Driggs and Rexburg. The service begins in Driggs at 7:00 a.m. and arrives at Rexburg at 8:30 a.m. This service connects with the Idaho Falls Intercity Transportation Services at the Rexburg office.  The bus returns to Driggs, leaving Rexburg at 9:00 a.m.  The afternoon service leaves Driggs at 2:30 p.m. and connects with the Idaho Falls service again at the Rexburg office.  The service ends at Driggs at 5:00 p.m.  The cost from Driggs to Rexburg is $12.00 (one-way).  (The cost from Idaho Falls to Driggs is $17.00 one-way.)

 

            Specialized Transportation Services

 

CART Inc. provides specialized transportation services for groups, as needed.  Disability Workshops, Senior Centers, Day Care Facilities have used CART Inc. services in the Driggs area.   The cost for the service is $50.00 per hour per bus. 

 

Generally, we do not provide this service for the general public, but refer them to the available for-profit transportation companies in the area.

 

SALMON SERVICES

 

The Public Transportation services in the Salmon area are operated from the Salmon office at 206 St. Charles Place, Salmon, Idaho.  The Salmon services are operated by Site Manager, Patti Burns and can be reached at 1 (208) 756-2191.

 

CART Inc. provides an average of 500 rides each month in Lemhi County.  Approximately 61 % are seniors and/or disabled.  Over 21% are students.

 

Demand Response (Door-to-Door) Services

 

CART Inc. has two vehicles to provide demand response services in the Lemhi County Area.  Operating hours are Monday – Friday, from 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.  Cost for this service is $2.00 one way in town and $1.00 additional per mile out of town.

 

            Intercity Services

 

A weekly Intercity Transportation Service is provided every Tuesday from Salmon to Idaho Falls.  The service begins in Salmon at 7:00 a.m. with stops in Challis, Mackay and Arco.  The riders transfer to the Idaho Falls Intercity Service in Challis.  The vehicle returns to Salmon and arrives at 11:00 a.m.  The afternoon service leaves Salmon at 4:00 p.m. and connects with the Idaho Falls service at Challis for the return trip.  This service ends in Salmon at 8:00 p.m.  The cost for this service (one-way) is $9.00 to Challis, $15.00 to Mackay, $18.00 to Arco and $25.00 to Idaho Falls.

 

CART Inc. also provides a public transportation service to Missoula, Montana from Salmon on Monday, Wednesday and Friday for a cost of $35.00 one way.

           

Specialized Transportation Services

 

CART Inc. provides specialized transportation services for groups, as needed.  Disability Workshops, Senior Centers, Day Care Facilities have used CART Inc. services in the Salmon area.  The cost for the service is $50.00 per hour per bus. 

 

Generally, we do not provide this service for the general public, but refer them to the available for-profit transportation companies in the area.

 

FUNDING SOURCES

 

CART Inc. has diverse services and funding is diverse as well.  Grants are requested annually from the Idaho Transportation Department for rural public transportation services to cover administrative, operating and capital costs.  Medicaid provides transportation funds for those clients who have been approved for the assistance.  CART Inc. has several contracts with agencies for transportation for its clients, such as Foster Grandparents or Headstart.  By working with several agencies, we can meet the transportation needs of more clients and coordinate public transportation services more effectively.


 

 

CART ANNUAL RIDERSHIP SUMMARY             July, 2004 - June 2005

City

S1

S2

H1

H2

ST

GP

HSC

TOTAL

MEDICADE

IDAHO FALLS

4046

431

17180

4417

1615

3521

6443

37653

20761

percent

11%

1%

46%

12%

4%

9%

17%

100%

55%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DRIGGS

910

75

4163

559

750

1132

1032

8621

4501

percent

11%

1%

48%

6%

9%

13%

12%

100%

52%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

REXBURG

1444

95

12524

1751

2010

2614

148

20586

10484

percent

7%

0%

61%

9%

10%

13%

1%

100%

51%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SALMON

792

42

6301

1594

2173

636

278

11816

6879

percent

7%

0%

53%

13%

18%

5%

2%

100%

58%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL ALL CITIES

7192

643

40168

8321

6548

7903

7901

78676

42625

percent

9%

1%

51%

11%

8%

10%

10%

100%

54%

S1 Ambulatory Seniors          H1 Ambulatory Disabled                   ST Students              HSC Headstart Children

S2 Seniors in Wheelchairs     H2 Disabled in Wheelchairs             GP General Public

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

__________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

Southern Teton Area Rapid Transit (START)    Top of the Document

 

START takes pride in the following accomplishments during the last two years.

 

1. NEW BUSES- START purchased 12 new buses in the last two years These buses are wrapped with beautiful scenes depicting the natural splendor and varied outdoor activities that make Jackson Hole unique.  The infusion of these buses into the START fleet has dramatically improved START’s image in the community.

 

START is now working with local community organizations to submit images to be used for these stunning graphic displays on START buses.

 

2. COMMUTER SERVICE - Commuter service from Lincoln County (Alpine), implemented in December 2003, was expanded in December of 2004 to include service from Etna and ridership has grown from 772 in the first month to the current level of over 1,700 per month.  This past spring START expanded seating capacity, comfort, safety and attractiveness of this commuter service by leasing an over- the- road coach.  This bus added comfort features like a restroom, over head lighting and reclining seats.  It also increased seating from 37 to 55 on a bus that often had standing room only on past winter’s commuter runs.

 

START is currently finalizing funding plans for a similar service for commuters from Idaho that make that difficult trip over Teton Pass every day.  It is expected this service will begin in April 2006.

 

3.GROWING RIDERHSIP- START total ridership for the year 2005will exceed a total of over 533,000.  This is 21 % increase in ridership one year ago, and a 42% increase in ridership two years ago. 

 

4. COMMUNITY RELATIONSHIPS-  START has strengthened and improved its relationships with local businesses.  For the first time ever, the President of the Jackson Hole Mountain Resort  (JHMR) spoke to START bus drivers during training about their important role as ambassadors to Jackson Hole. 

 

START also worked with JHMR and other local businesses on a promotion to kick off the winter season.  Strong relationships with START's business partners have helped increase ridership through delivery of exceptional customer service.

 

5. TRANSIT SYSTEM OF THE YEAR- START was given the honor of being named the Year 2005 Transit System of the year for the state of Wyoming by the Wyoming Public Transit Association.

 

 

__________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 


Idaho  SAFETEA Funding Estimates 2004-2009   Top of the Document

 

US Department of Transportation --Federal Transit Administration

 

PRELIMINARY ESTIMATES

 

 

FY2006-2009 funding estimates based on preliminary information released by FTA on Selected Program Totals

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Area)Program

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Total

Boise/53071Sma1l Urban/Large Urban

$2,138,519

$2,234,730

 

 

 

 

$4,373,249

Coeur d’Alene /5307/Small Urban

$751,420

$787,479

 

 

 

 

$1,538,899

Idaho Falls/5307/SmalI Urban

$741,498

$777,081

 

 

 

 

$1,518,579

Lewistonl53o7/SmaIl Urban

$319,223

$334,542

 

 

 

 

$653,765

NampaJ53O7/Small Urban

$1,042,036

$1,092,040

 

 

 

 

$2,134,076

Pocatello/5307/Small Urban

$679,693

$712,310

 

 

 

 

$1,392,003

Urbanized area Program 5307

$5,672,389

$5,938,182

$6,174,501

$6,300,000

$6,900,000

$7,300,000

$38,285,072

Metropolitan Planning /5303

$245,825

$242,515

$312,775

$325,912

$352,185

$373,766

$1,852,978

Statewide Planning /5313/5304

$66,295

$63,298

$82,000

$85,000

$92,000

$97,400

$485,993

Statewide E&PWD 15310

$454,617

$471,058

$529,995

$553,845

$601,014

$631,754

$3,242,283

Statewide Rural /5311

$1,836,315

$1,922,040

$4,863,139

$5,062,528

$5,490,484

$5,826,041

$25,000,547

Rural Transit Assistance I 5311 (b)2

$79,352

$79,267

$86,764

$90,321

$97,957

$103,943

$537,604

Tribal Rural 5311(c)

 

 

$242,400

$303,700

$363,600

$454,500

$1,364,200

Job Access Reverse Commute 5316

 

 

$635,500

$663,462

$718,115

$757,516

$2,774,593

New Freedoms 5317

 

 

$351,725

$365,091

$394,635

$416,794

$1,528,245

Section 5309 Discretionary Auth.

 

 

$2,538,260

$2,640,880

$2,866,120

$3,016,740

$11,062,000

Section 5309 Discretionary Approp

$3,883,494

$3,401,224

$4,000,000

 

 

 

$11,284,718

Totals

$12,238,287

$12,117,584

$19,817,059

$16,390,739

$17,876,110

$18,978,454

$97,418,233

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TEA-21 Funding 1998-2003

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As published in Federal Registers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Area/Program

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

total

Boise/53071Sma1l Urban/Large Urban

$1,448,837

$1,601,327

$1,741,957

$1,844,412

$2,021,464

$2,166,521

$10,824,518

Coeur d’Alene /5307/Small Urban

 

 

 

 

 

$751,505

$751,505

Idaho Falls/5307/SmalI Urban

$519,380

$574,044

$624,457

$661,186

$724,655

$741,582

$3,845,304

Lewiston/5307/SmaIl Urban

 

 

 

 

 

$319,259

$319,259

Nampa/5307/Small Urban

 

 

 

 

 

$1,042,153

$1,042,153

Pocatello/5307/Small Urban

$399,496

$441,543

$480,320

$508,571

$557,390

$679,770

$3,067,090

Statewide E&PWD/5310

$342,701

$362,024

$385,025

$403,008

$431,983

$453,848

$2,378,589

Statewide Rural /5311

$1,066,162

$1,406,508

$1,524,027

$1,625,002

$1,790,472

$1,839,806

$9,251,977

Statewide Planning /5313

$42,360

$46,286

$51,875

$54,694

$58,493

$63,216

$316,924

Metropolitan Planning /5303

$158,502

$175,605

$198,569

$209,116

$222,652

$241,774

$1,206,218

Rural Transit Assistance / 5311(b)2

$66,518

$81,187

$76,429

$81,206

$80,150

$79,335

$464,825

Section 5309 Bus Discretionary

 

 

 

$3,466,102

$3,465,102

$2,459,197

$9,390,401

Totals

$4,043,956

$4,688,524

$5,082,659

$8,853,297

$9,352,361

$10,837,966

$42,858,763

 

 

__________________________________________________________

 

 

 


Wyoming SAFETEA Funding Estimates 2004-2009   Top of the Document

 

 

US Department of Transportation --Federal Transit Administration

 

WYOMING PRELIMINARY ESTIMATES

 

FY2006-2009 funding estimates based on preliminary information released by FTA on Selected Program Totals

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Area/Program

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Total

Cheyenne/53O7/Small Urban

$745,106

$515,572

 

 

 

 

$1,260,678

Casper/5307/Small Urban

$629,628

$457,554

 

 

 

 

$1,087,182

Urbanized area Program 5307

$1,374,734

$973,126

$1,449,295

$1,507,692

$1,635,042

$1,739,167

$8,679,056

Metropolitan Planning /5303

$245,825

$171,209

$312,775

$325,933

$352,185

$373,671

$1,781,598

Statewide Planning /5313/5304

$66,295

$44,673

$82,000

$85,106

$92,000

$97,574

$467,648

Statewide E&PWD 15310

$255,598

$214,136

$288,562

$296,342

$311,903

$322,017

$1,688,558

Statewide Rural /5311

$978,792

$691,990

$3,903,933

$4,048,369

$4,377,593

$4,625,045

$18,625,722

Rural Transit Assistance I 5311 (b)2

$72,650

$46,690

$78,358

$79,476

$81,851

$83,737

$442,762

Tribal Rural 5311(c)

 

 

$204,256

$255,319

$306,383

$382,979

$1,148,937

Job Access Reverse Commute 5316

 

 

$204,405

$213,292

$231,066

$243,656

$892,419

New Freedoms 5317

 

 

$161,605

$167,820

$181,287

$191,646

$702,358

Section 5309 Discretionary Auth.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Section 5309 Discretionary Approp

$1,997,204

 

$687,000

$714,000

$776,000

$823,000

$4,997,204

Totals

$4,991,098

$2,141,824

$7,372,189

$7,693,349

$8,345,310

$8,882,492

$39,426,262

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TEA-21 Funding 1998-2003

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As published in Federal Registers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Area/Program

 

 

 

 

2002

2003

total

Cheyenne/53O7/Small Urban

 

 

 

 

$660,701

$709,993

$1,370,694

Casper/5307/Small Urban

 

 

 

 

$559,938

$664,896

$1,224,834

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Statewide E&PWD/5310

 

 

 

 

$243,051

$255,294

$498,345

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Statewide Rural /5311

 

 

 

 

$980,653

$980,653

$1,961,306

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Statewide Planning /5313

 

 

 

 

$58,493

$63,216

$121,709

Metropolitan Planning /5303

 

 

 

 

$222,652

$241,774

$464,426

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rural Transit Assistance / 5311(b)2

 

 

 

 

$72,059

$72,641

$144,700

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Section 5309 Bus Discretionary

 

 

 

 

 

$1,997,204

$1,997,204

Totals

 

 

 

 

$2,797,547

$4,985,671

$7,783,218

 

 

__________________________________________________________

 

 

 


 

 

Weekday Commuter Traffic Peaks Teton Pass, July 2005   Top of the Document

 

 

__________________________________________________________

 

 

 


Downtown Driggs Design Charrett Draft Report- December 2005   Top of the Document

 

A design Charrette was held in Driggs, Idaho from November 7 – 11, 2005.  Among many innovative recommendations in the draft report prepared by CIVITAS were the following …

 

“Achieving a more unified and equitable downtown will

require an improved transportation system that provides

regional transportation alternatives to reach downtown. …..

 

• A new bus transit station and park and ride facility should be

located in downtown.” 

 

 

 

__________________________________________________________

 

 

 


Grand Teton National Park Transportation Plan    Top of the Document

 

While still under review to incorporate the latest public comments, the Grand Teton National Park Transportation Plan released earlier in 2005 included both transit and new separated pathways in several of the alternatives including preferred alternative 3.

 

 

 

__________________________________________________________

 

 

 


SAFETEA-LU – Alternative Transportation in Parks and Public Lands    Top of the Document

 

FTA Authorization Fact Sheet

Alternative Transportation in Parks and Public Lands

(in millions)

Year

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Total

Mass Transit Account

$22.0

$23.0

$25.0

$26.9

$96.9

General Fund

Total Alternative Transportation in Parks and Public Lands

$22.0

$23.0

$25.0

$26.9

$96.9

 

Purpose

The new Alternative Transportation in Parks and Public Lands program (also known as Transit in the Parks) provides funds to support public transportation projects in parks and public lands. TEA-21 (Title III, Section 3039) authorized a study of transit needs in national parks and related public lands.

 

Statutory References

Section 5320 of Title 49, United States Code

 

Features

 

·         Establishes a new Alternative Transportation in Parks and Public Lands Program, administered by DOT under a Memorandum of Understanding between DOT and the Department of the Interior, signed within 90 days of enactment).

·         Provides grants for planning or capital projects in or near national parks or other public land areas.

·         Requires annual program of projects to allocate funds.

·         Requires DOT to develop cooperative arrangements with the Department of the Interior that provide for technical assistance in alternative transportation, provide teams to develop Federal land management agency alternative transportation policy, procedures and coordination, and develop procedures and criteria for the planning, selection, and funding of projects, as well as implementation and oversight.

·         Applies sections 5307 and 5333(a) of Title 49, United States Code, to the extent the Secretary deems appropriate; Section 5333(b) labor protections are not extended in this new program

·         Requires that qualified projects $25 million and over be carried out through a full funding grant agreement.

·         Allows projects receiving funds under this section also to be eligible for funding through a state infrastructure bank or innovative finance mechanism.

·         Makes National Forest System lands explicitly eligible and includes bicycle and pedestrian projects in the definition of alternative transportation.

 

 

__________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

Energy Policy Act of 2005 – Section 721   Top of the Document

 

The following text excerpts from section 721 of the 2005 Energy Bill created a new program to support alternatively fueled vehicle pilot projects and require partnership with a registered Clean Cities participant:

 

 

SEC. 721. PILOT PROGRAM.

 

(a) Establishment- The Secretary, in consultation with the Secretary of Transportation, shall establish a competitive grant pilot program (referred to in this part as the `pilot program'), to be administered through the Clean Cities Program of the Department, to provide not more than 30 geographically dispersed project grants to State governments, local governments, or metropolitan transportation authorities to carry out a project or projects for the purposes described in subsection (b).

 

(b) Grant Purposes- A grant under this section may be used for the following purposes:

…………

 

(2) The acquisition of alternative fueled vehicles, hybrid vehicles, or fuel cell vehicles, including—

(A) buses used for public transportation or transportation to and from schools;

…………

 (4) Installation or acquisition of infrastructure necessary to directly support an alternative fueled vehicle, fuel cell vehicle, or hybrid vehicle project funded by the grant, including fueling and other support equipment.

 

(5) Operation and maintenance of vehicles, infrastructure, and equipment acquired as part of a project funded by the grant.

…………

 

(c) Applications-

(1) REQUIREMENTS-

…………

(i) be submitted by the head of a State or local government or a metropolitan transportation authority, or any combination thereof, and a registered participant in the Clean Cities Program of the Department…….

 

 

 

__________________________________________________________

 

 

 


A Yellow Bus for the Greater Yellowstone       Top of the Document

 

Yellowstone National Park has been supporting the development of a modern, ADA compliant, transit vehicle that could serve as the basis for an enhanced visitor experience throughout the region.  In the spirit of the original YNP bus system, this new vehicle is called the “Yellow Bus”.

 

Capable of being converted to tracks for over snow travel the vehicle can serve many different roles.  The current version is built by International and is designed with large windows, including skylights and forward viewing in the passenger area.  While not the only vehicle needed for a regional system, the concept of a Yellow Bus goes a long way towards branding the region’s transportation capabilities and creating an experience that can be more desirable than using a private vehicle.

 

 

 

__________________________________________________________

 

 

 


 

 

Greater Yellowstone-Teton Clean Cities Coalition     Top of the Document

 

GYTCCC Mission - Clean Cities coalitions’ collective mission is to displace the use of petroleum in the transportation sector, improve air quality through reduced harmful exhaust emissions and increase U.S. energy security. Clean Cities advocates using renewable fuels and advanced energy technologies, driving hybrid vehicles, and reducing truck and bus idling practices. Yellowstone National Park is a pioneer in the use of alternative fuel—especially biodiesel—and has acted as a prime source of information for the public. Several million visitors annually are exposed to the possibilities of alternative fuels, seeing them in use in park vehicles and in stationary installations generating power and heating water.

 

The GYTCCC membership has representatives from every major gateway community in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton region as well as the National Parks and Forests.  This diverse group of stakeholders rotates quarterly meetings throughout the region and has been active for nearly ten years.  As a major supporter of regional collaboration the GYTCC has encouraged the concept of a tri-state transportation system that would increase mobility while reducing oil consumption and emissions.